All posts by IDAAdmin

TED-ED Lesson on Islamic Geometric Design by Eric Broug

Here’s a quick (just over 5 minutes) video lesson on Islamic geometric patterns – a brief history, some core principles of how they are created and an array of examples both demonstrated and from real architectural sites around the world.

This lesson was made by Eric Broug, a world famous author of Islamic pattern-making books who also runs workshops. Have a look at his website here: http://broug.com/

And join his Facebook group for daily examples of artworks being created by members or being sighted and shared from various locations around the world: Broug Ateliers for Islamic Geometric Design

 

Islamic art – Interactive learning for adults and children

For an in-depth view of the history and aesthetics of Islamic art alongside thousands of examples of artworks visit the Discover Islamic art website: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/

Areas of the subject are split by smaller topics based on time periods, dynasties and decorative styles. You can also search through the databases and collections from various museums around the world

Discover_Islamic_Art_Virtual_Exhibitions_-_2015-06-27_12.53.27

Discover Islamic Art website: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/ by Museum With No Frontiers (MWF)

Something that might appeal to a younger audience is the selection of interactive games that have also been produced as part of ‘Learn with MWF': http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/index.html

Learn with MWF

Learn with MWF: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/index.html

The overall design of the page and elements does not shout ‘children’s fun learning’ (my experience in web design and usability kicking in here) but it has the potential to be an effective and engaging learning tool. The above game ‘Where Would You Put Me?’ encourages the user to try and match the object name with the picture on the right of the screen.

Learn with Museum With No Frontiers: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/exe1/index_en.html

Interactive game ‘Where Would You Put Me': http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/exe1/index_en.html

Once you have correctly labelled each object (even I had to guess a few of these as the images are not clear until you open them up individually, and neither is the font used for the text), you are taken to the next stage where you can group objects according to the environment they would have been found and used in. The four categories provided below are Mosque, Palace, Fort and House:

Interactive game Learn with Discover Islamic Art

Interactive game ‘Learn with Discover Islamic Art': http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/exe1/index_en.html

In summary this is a great way to engage a younger audience and helps familiarise children with objects found in many museums’ Islamic art collections.

Introduction to Arduino

A practical workshop where you can learn basic methods for producing interactive design using Arduino will be hosted at the V&A on 27 June 2015! To book click here >
(tickets cost £80/£64 concession)

If you are not so keen on spending the £80 needed to book the V&A workshop then why not try a bit of self-learning? There are tonnes of videos and tutorials to be found online.

What is Arduino?
“an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board”. In other words, a circuit system that connects to a power source (either your computer or even a battery) and other devices based on your needs. You can, for example, connect sensors to your board to detect certain aspects of the environment (such as sound or movement) and then have this converted into data to manipulate as you wish. You can use the Arduino coding environment (download it from their website here: http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Software) or a coding environment such as Processing to produce particular actions based on variables within the gathered data.

Learn more about Arduino here: http://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction

Check out demos and tutorials on the Processing website to get you started:   https://processing.org/tutorials/

Digital workshops and drop-in sessions in London

If you’re looking for opportunities to learn more about Digital art, design, technology and innovation then the following workshops and drop-in sessions in London may be just for you. Best of all, they’re free!

Digital workshop – The British Museum’s Innovation Lab. Sunday 21 June, 11.00–16.00
Find out more here >

Digital Design Drop-in – Victoria and Albert Museum’s Sculpture Room 21a. Saturdays, 26 April, 24 May, 21 June 13.00 – 16.00
Find out more here >

Read more about Digital Art & Design on the V&A’s website: http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/d/digital-art-and-design/

Tiles – project on digitising Islamic art tiles at the Met Museum

Here’s an amazing project by two interns working with Islamic art tiles in The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection. They used a combination of Processing and OpenFrameworks to make this interactive iPad app:

Read more about the project here: Exploring Algorithms in Islamic Art through Augmented Reality

Printing fun at the 3D Printshow London, Sep 2014

3D printing has really picked up the pace in the last few years, and events like the annual 3D Printshow is catering to the interest and demands of both businesses and individuals.

The show features a line-up of commercial solutions for businesses, printing services for all types of clients (large and small) and platforms for showcasing design work by agencies and artists. There are also a number of educational talks from various guest speakers who have worked with 3D printing, including in fashion!

At this year’s show I enjoyed learning of Richard Beckett‘s work with Pringle of Scotland, where 3D printing was used to create innovative fabrics for items in their A/W 2014 collection:

Richard Becketts 3D Printed fabric embellishments for Pringle of Scotland, A/W 2014

Richard Beckett’s 3D Printed fabric embellishments for Pringle of Scotland, A/W 2014

 

Detail of Richard Becketts 3D Printed fabric embellishments for Pringle of Scotland, A/W 2014

Detail of Richard Beckett’s 3D Printed fabric embellishments for Pringle of Scotland, A/W 2014

I also loved visiting the booths in the showroom where many creative examples of 3D printing were on display including jewellery, clothing, toys, stationary, cutlery and even food!!

Take Belgian chocolate printing for one!! This service was provided by Choc Edge, and not only did it look great, but it also smelt and tasted great! 100% edible dark chocolate printed in whichever design you want.

Printing with chocolate by Choc Edge

Printing with Belgian chocolate by Choc Edge at the 3D Printshow, London 2014

I asked the guys at the booth to kindly try out one of the Islamic patterns I was working with and they were happy to do it. They hadn’t tried something this intricate and of this style of design but once the file was uploaded and the printer got going, the results were amazing! I was in awe:

Prep work for printing files with chocolate by Choc Edge

Prep work for printing files with chocolate by Choc Edge

 

Chocolate printed Islamic art by Choc Edge

Chocolate printed Islamic art, a special request fulfilled by Choc Edge at the 3D Printshow, London 2014

There are so many possibilities with 3D printing, it can make your mouth water (quite literally). Below are photos I took from the show which give a much better idea of the fun and creative output achievable with today’s technology!

Laser cutting for Textiles at Central Saint Martins

A week of laser-cutting fun!

Regents Canal opposite Granary Square

Regents Canal opposite Granary Square

I joined the Central Saint Martins (CSM) short course on Laser-cutting for Textiles, located in Granary Square alongside the Regent’s canal.  This was a week long course introducing students to the process of creating electronic (Adobe Illustrator) files to be used for laser-cutting, the various effects and techniques that can be achieved with laser cutting, and an array of fabrics, materials and textures to experiment with. The title is, therefore, a little misleading, as it wasn’t just fabrics we worked with, however there was a slight more slant towards fashion.

Our course tutor was Laura Baker, a specialist in fashion and textile print. And our technical tutor was Franklin Mok, both staff at the University of the Arts London (UAL), of which CSM forms a part. We were also joined by Miriam Griffiths, a knitwear designer and alumni of the London College of Fashion (also part of the UAL).

Laura demonstrated pattern-making methods within Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. We were also shown numerous examples of jewellery, fashion, food, and everyday objects and furnishings that have been designed or made using laser cutting. There were many previously cut samples on hand and we soon learnt that what may work on one type of fabric/material may look terrible on another and that accidents can sometimes lead to interesting results. Some materials worked better and others were not strong enough for the laser to engrave for example.

 

We were shown the materials library where a huge wall was adorned with hundreds of samples of plastics, woods, metals, fabrics, stone, etc. There were also many reference books on fashion and textiles and future developments within this area. Experimentation was very much encouraged.

Materials Library within Central Saint Martins

Materials Library within Central Saint Martins

We were taken down to the laser cutting room where we were introduced to a huge Trotec laser machine. As indicated on the front it could not only cut but also engrave and mark/score.

Trotec Laser cutting machine at CSM

Trotec Laser cutting machine at CSM

We were shown that specific cyan colours (magenta, blue, green and black) are interpreted by the computer as being either an internal cut, external cut, engraving or scoring. These lines had to be paths within an EPS or AI file format and be only hairline thin (with the exception of the engraving).

The following image shows engraving, scoring, internal and external cuts:

Sample demo of laser effects on veneer

Sample demo of laser effects on veneer

We were also taken to a few shops in the Aldgate area where we discovered suppliers of rare leather pieces from various animals. See if you can guess what each of these animal skin is? Most leather pieces had been treated with colour and stretched or stitched so may not look natural (pink rabbit skin being a key example).

Miriam Griffiths brought in some of her final year work of knitwear. Within the designs she also added pieces of laser cut wood. These wood pieces helped with the structural design of her garments which were based on garments worn by a remote tribe in China.

More of Miriam’s work can be seen on her website: http://www.miriamgriffiths.co.uk/

The next day we got on with designing our first samples for laser cutting. I’ve recently worked with iznik flower motifs so following in this theme I looked on the V&A Museum’s website some inspiration. I liked the look of the carnations on this velvet fabric dated at 1600-50:

Velvet fabric with carnation pattern c1600-50

Velvet fabric with carnation pattern c1600-50 (Image from V&A website:

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/t/teachers-resource-exploring-plant-based-design-through-the-jameel-gallery-of-islamic-art/)

I began working on isolating and redrawing the flower shape in Photoshop and then switched to Illustrator for colouring the drawn paths which would be where the laser would engrave and cut the material:

Preparing flower motif file

Preparing flower motif file

I chose to use the metallic leather sample piece I obtained from one of the leather shops we visited earlier in the week for the flower motifs:

Flower motif laser cut into metallic cow leather

Flower motif laser cut into metallic cow leather

I later realised that I should have changed the colour of the middle paths so that those would have been internal cuts. Instead I cut one of the motifs’ inner strokes by hand to see how this would look.

Flower motif laser cut from metallic cow leather

Flower motif laser cut from metallic cow leather

You realise when going through the process of designing, amending and laser-cutting the pieces that it can be very much trial and error until you’ve had a bit of practice with not only the design file, but also the material you work with. The same file worked well on stronger materials like the mirrored acrylic but not so much on the thinner sheepskin leather shown below:

Flower motif laser cut into acrylic and sheepskin leather

Flower motif laser cut into mirrored acrylic and sheepskin leather

Princes School of Traditional Arts Degree Show 2014

I managed to catch the Degree Show at The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts (PSTA), an exhibition of work produced by graduates of the postgraduate programme.

As you may have guessed, there are strong ties between traditional arts and crafts Islamic art. In fact ‘traditional arts and crafts’ is often the description provided for the term ‘Islamic art’, and it is usually these types of items that are displayed as examples of it. Rightly, or wrongly? It is debatable.  However, we must acknowledge that the link persists, and thankfully, the skills have been passed on to generations of artists and craftsmen today.

At the PSTA, students hone their skills of creativity and activity to produce contemporary artworks using traditional methods and materials, and always to a high standard.

Below is work produced by Ahmed Angawi, who comes from a product design background. His hand-made woodwork combined various woods to enable a mixture of shades and patterns within his pieces.

Close-up of woodwork by Ahmed Angawi

Close-up of woodwork by Ahmed Angawi

Woodwork by Ahmed Angawi

Woodwork by Ahmed Angawi

Also, on show were a pair of beautiful replica Hijazi doors produced by Sarah Al Abdali, using plaster.

Plaster replica Hijazi doors by Sara Al Abdali

Plaster replica Hijazi doors by Sara Al Abdali

Detail of plaster replica Hijazi doors by Sara Al Abdali

Detail of plaster replica Hijazi doors by Sara Al Abdali

Close-up of plaster replica Hijazi doors by Sara Al Abdali

Close-up of plaster replica Hijazi doors by Sara Al Abdali

The inspiration behind this piece was Sarah’s discovery of the original wooden doors within the Jameel Centre collection in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, England.

Hijazi Doors, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

17th century, carved wooden Hijazi Doors at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. Image and item details can be viewed here: http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/object/EAX.422

Cutwork pieces by Sarah Al Abdali

Laser-cut pieces by Sarah Al Abdali

Having viewed previous work produced from PSTA gradautes, it was great to see  students are now also experimenting more with new technologies such as laser-cutting. It’ll be interesting to see how much technology will influence the work produced by artists in future.

Another favourite was the Zouaq ceiling by Natasha Mann who learnt this unique method for decorating wood in Morocco:

Zouaq ceiling by Natasha Mann

Zouaq ceiling by Natasha Mann (for further details visit http://www.natashazouaq.co.uk)

Painting by Natasha Mann

Painting by Natasha Mann using hand ground natural pigments with egg tempera and 24 carat gold leaf.

Painting by Natasha Mann

Painting by Natasha Mann using hand ground natural pigments with egg tempera and 24 carat gold leaf.

Further images below demonstrate some of the incredibly intricate work on show:

Read more about The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts and both their taught and public programmes on their website: http://psta.org.uk/

 

Iznik: Ottoman Ceramic Design at PSTA

The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts (based in East London) runs a number of practical short-courses. I recently attended the Iznik: Ottoman Ceramic Design course where a small group of students learnt how to apply focussed and delicate brush strokes to ceramic tiles and plates. The class firstly taught us that concentration and a calm approach is key to producing the best results. We spent some time practising small lines and swirls. I honestly found this a little difficult, as I am used to applying deliberate and highly pressure movements through my tools, be it pens or brushes. As a result my brush strokes using ink came out quite bulky 😐 This technique called for dainty elegance for sure.

We soon moved on to experimenting with applying glaze to tiles. The change of texture was stark and proved even more difficult to work with. However the tutor, Nooshin Shafiei (very much an expert in the art of ceramic design) was able to depose some tips and eventually we cracked on with our final pieces – large ceramic plates!

Designs were transferred on to the plates by applying red powder dye to the back of the paper and then tracing over the top so that the pattern was drawn with the powder only.

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

We chose designs from a beautiful book full of photographic examples of Iznik ceramics: Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey I chose the following design. I thought it was simple enough for my less than advanced skills but I soon learnt that even this was perhaps a little ambitious. In the following two sessions, conversation amongst students centred on one topic – the desire to make this final piece worthy of display in our own homes. The collective goal was to give it everything we had.

The various stages of my efforts are displayed below:

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

 

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

Iznik ceramic design class at PSTA

However, based on our tests on glazing tiles previously, it would not be until much later, once the plates had been fired that we would know exactly how our skills played out in reality…

Iznik ceramic plate design

Original plate that I was trying to replicate

Detail of Iznik ceramic plate design

Detail of Iznik ceramic plate design

The plate is now ready for it’s final coat of transparent glaze which will give it a shiny smooth surface.

Overall, the class was very enjoyable. I learnt new motif designs distinctive of the Iznik region within the Ottoman reign. I’ve not done much freehand, non-geometric art practice so this was definitely something new and challenging for me but I am very glad I decided to do it. The fellow students and the teacher Nooshin made it a very friendly environment with lots of interaction dispersed with the much appreciated tea-breaks (thanks for the biscuits Nooshin!).

I would highly recommend practical short-courses to anyone who either has a soft-spot for creativity, is looking for some inspiration, wants a break from their normal life routine or for the opportunity to meet new people. For further information on courses provided by the Prince’s School of Traditional Arts have a look on their website: http://www.psta.org.uk/openprogramme/

Design Museum London

Design Museum London

Design Museum London

A visit to the Design Museum (London) is full of a surprising array of objects. I was not sure what to expect but the collection of well designed examples included stationary, print work, clothing, shoes, parts of buildings, architectural scale models, mobile apps, mobile devices, and conceptual solutions to everyday problems, from the mundane to the extraordinary, including a beautiful sports car.

The collection demonstrated the best of design from 2014, with entrants nominated by peers. Below is imagery of some of my favourites examples:

 

DAS Abayas

DAS Abayas

Dumb Ways To Die - Metro Trains,  Designed by McCann Melbourne

Dumb Ways To Die (http://dumbwaystodie.com/) – Designed by McCann Melbourne

Also within the museum were exhibitions focussed on specific creative individuals. We saw beautiful time pieces designed by Daniel Weil including a range of his commercial design projects:

Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum
Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum
Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum
Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum

The museum was also exhibiting the larger than life decades worth of Paul Smith history. Hello, My Name is Paul Smith starts with a display of Smith’s first shop, re-created to its tiny life-size proportions showing us Smith’s humble beginnings that eventually turned into a huge design house now worth millions. His story was told in simple terms with examples of his iconic prints illustrating his journey. His prints have been applied to hundreds of objects and he has worked on a number of high profile collaborations with companies such as Mini (cars), Evian (water bottles), Thomas Goode (Teapots), Roberts Radio and The Rug Company.

Paul Smith Mini Cooper

Paul Smith Mini Cooper

Paul Smith Shop Facade

Paul Smith Shop Facade

Paul Smith print swatch

Paul Smith print swatch

I have a soft spot for Paul Smith’s prints and colour schemes and they bode well on fashion as well as stationary. The huge collection of items form only a fraction of the work and belongings of the designer, but still provide a vast insight into what appears to be his creative genius.