Tag Archives: interactive

Digital Art & Design at the V&A, London

The V&A has for some time been collecting and exhibiting digital/computer art, including interactive installations. I came across a video of an exhibition that took place at the V&A in 2009. The great thing about online documentation of events, collections and knowledge is that it can be found at any point in time (assuming it is still accessible) for those who may have missed a specific event or moment of it’s first being shared in a physical space.

Decode: Digital Design Sensations:

Read more about digital art and design activities, past and present,  on the V&A website: http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/d/digital-art-and-design/

Islamic art – Interactive learning for adults and children

For an in-depth view of the history and aesthetics of Islamic art alongside thousands of examples of artworks visit the Discover Islamic art website: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/

Areas of the subject are split by smaller topics based on time periods, dynasties and decorative styles. You can also search through the databases and collections from various museums around the world

Discover_Islamic_Art_Virtual_Exhibitions_-_2015-06-27_12.53.27

Discover Islamic Art website: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/ by Museum With No Frontiers (MWF)

Something that might appeal to a younger audience is the selection of interactive games that have also been produced as part of ‘Learn with MWF': http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/index.html

Learn with MWF

Learn with MWF: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/index.html

The overall design of the page and elements does not shout ‘children’s fun learning’ (my experience in web design and usability kicking in here) but it has the potential to be an effective and engaging learning tool. The above game ‘Where Would You Put Me?’ encourages the user to try and match the object name with the picture on the right of the screen.

Learn with Museum With No Frontiers: http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/exe1/index_en.html

Interactive game ‘Where Would You Put Me': http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/exe1/index_en.html

Once you have correctly labelled each object (even I had to guess a few of these as the images are not clear until you open them up individually, and neither is the font used for the text), you are taken to the next stage where you can group objects according to the environment they would have been found and used in. The four categories provided below are Mosque, Palace, Fort and House:

Interactive game Learn with Discover Islamic Art

Interactive game ‘Learn with Discover Islamic Art': http://www.discoverislamicart.org/learn/exe1/index_en.html

In summary this is a great way to engage a younger audience and helps familiarise children with objects found in many museums’ Islamic art collections.

Introduction to Arduino

A practical workshop where you can learn basic methods for producing interactive design using Arduino will be hosted at the V&A on 27 June 2015! To book click here >
(tickets cost £80/£64 concession)

If you are not so keen on spending the £80 needed to book the V&A workshop then why not try a bit of self-learning? There are tonnes of videos and tutorials to be found online.

What is Arduino?
“an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board”. In other words, a circuit system that connects to a power source (either your computer or even a battery) and other devices based on your needs. You can, for example, connect sensors to your board to detect certain aspects of the environment (such as sound or movement) and then have this converted into data to manipulate as you wish. You can use the Arduino coding environment (download it from their website here: http://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Software) or a coding environment such as Processing to produce particular actions based on variables within the gathered data.

Learn more about Arduino here: http://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction

Check out demos and tutorials on the Processing website to get you started:   https://processing.org/tutorials/

Blossom – Richard Clarkson

Blossom is described as an inflatable 3D print, the first of its kind.

As it makes use of both rigid and flexible material, air can be pumped into the piece allowing it to inflate, therefore giving the impression the flower is blooming.

Blossom - inflatable 3D print by Richard Clarkson

Blossom – inflatable 3D print by Richard Clarkson

The piece has been displayed as a flower box with multiple 3D printed inflatable flowers within. There are air pumps along the front allowing the user to manipulate the blooming of specific flowers thereby making the piece an interactive installation.

Here is a video of Blossom in action:

Blossom from Richard Clarkson on Vimeo.

And here is a link to Clarkson’s web site for further information: http://richardclarkson.com/blossom