Tag Archives: Paul Smith

Design Museum London

Design Museum London

Design Museum London

A visit to the Design Museum (London) is full of a surprising array of objects. I was not sure what to expect but the collection of well designed examples included stationary, print work, clothing, shoes, parts of buildings, architectural scale models, mobile apps, mobile devices, and conceptual solutions to everyday problems, from the mundane to the extraordinary, including a beautiful sports car.

The collection demonstrated the best of design from 2014, with entrants nominated by peers. Below is imagery of some of my favourites examples:

 

DAS Abayas

DAS Abayas

Dumb Ways To Die - Metro Trains,  Designed by McCann Melbourne

Dumb Ways To Die (http://dumbwaystodie.com/) – Designed by McCann Melbourne

Also within the museum were exhibitions focussed on specific creative individuals. We saw beautiful time pieces designed by Daniel Weil including a range of his commercial design projects:

Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum
Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum
Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum
Daniel Weil Clock at the Design Museum

The museum was also exhibiting the larger than life decades worth of Paul Smith history. Hello, My Name is Paul Smith starts with a display of Smith’s first shop, re-created to its tiny life-size proportions showing us Smith’s humble beginnings that eventually turned into a huge design house now worth millions. His story was told in simple terms with examples of his iconic prints illustrating his journey. His prints have been applied to hundreds of objects and he has worked on a number of high profile collaborations with companies such as Mini (cars), Evian (water bottles), Thomas Goode (Teapots), Roberts Radio and The Rug Company.

Paul Smith Mini Cooper

Paul Smith Mini Cooper

Paul Smith Shop Facade

Paul Smith Shop Facade

Paul Smith print swatch

Paul Smith print swatch

I have a soft spot for Paul Smith’s prints and colour schemes and they bode well on fashion as well as stationary. The huge collection of items form only a fraction of the work and belongings of the designer, but still provide a vast insight into what appears to be his creative genius.